Clelia Coussonnet is an independent curator, art editor and writer.

Clelia Coussonnet is an independent curator, art editor and writer.

Lately, her research has been revolving around botanical politics and power structures. She has been investigating how systems of meaning have been impressed upon nature, flora, and seeds throughout eras of imperialism, colonialism, and globalisation, resulting in the exhibitions Botany under Influence, apexart, New York, USA (2016); Leave No Stone Unturned [Remuer la terre], Le Cube — independent art room, Rabat, Morocco (2019); Ground Control [Markkontroll], Bildmuseet, Umeå, Sweden (2020); Planted in the Body, MeetFactory, Prague, Czech Republic (2021); Effet de Serre – Farah Khelil (Recipient of AFAC Visual Grant 2019), Parc du Belvédère, Tunis, Tunisia (2021), and in the essay Waking Dormant Seeds for Theatrum Botanicum, edited by Uriel Orlow and Shela Sheikh (Sternberg Press, 2018).

In this same line, she is interested in exploring the links between waters, toxicity and circulation, as initiated with Spoiled Waters Spilled, Ballet National de Marseille, Marseille, France in the framework of Manifesta 13, Les Parallèles du Sud. The show is bound to travel to the MMAG Foundation, Amman, Jordan, in 2021.

Recently, she curated Alter me, Alter you [Промени ме, променям те] at the Goethe-Institute Sofia, Bulgaria (2018); Olympic Stadium at Le Patio, Paris, France (2018); and the show, performance and night screening Au loin les signaux, al lou’lou’ held during the Heritage Days in the dockyards of L’Anse du Pharo, Marseilles, France (2017).

As an editor, she published driftongue with Clément Faydit and Alexandros Simopoulos (2018), result of a residency in Nuuk, Greenland (2017) – a workshop organised by Hors Pistes between international designers and local craftsmen. She also co-edited with Missla Libsekal In/Visible Voices of Women, an artist’s book on Safaa Erruas, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Nicène Kossentini, Amina Menia and Zineb Sedira (2019).

In 2019, she participates to the HICP residency in Helsinki with a new research on textile and knowledge production, but also to Tate Intensive: The Case for Action at the Tate Modern, in London, UK to rethink institutions, and to Gathering for Rehearsing Hospitalities with Frame Finland in Helsinki talking about gestural, material and corporeal knowledge.

As a curator, Clelia is interested in how visual cultures tackle political, social and spiritual issues in different, or complementary, ways than other disciplines. Through the bias of her political science background, turning her a sort of outsider, her concern originates from her fascination for deconstructing the invisible power structures that shape geopolitics and for understanding resistance strategies to domination patterns. As such, she follows artists who question social norms and conventions, as well as investigate narratives around history, memory and knowledge production and dissemination. Rummaging through the complex and liminal spaces between private/public, integration/isolation, individual/collective and confinement/emancipation is particularly interesting in that framework. In this light, exploring communication structures, codes, language and gestures is also crucial for her.

She is also interested in creating interdisciplinary projects outside of traditional art circuits, particularly in contexts linked to craft or heritage and in spaces previously unused for cultural projects.

Say hi

curator(at)sisume.com

Meet me in Marseilles – Returning from Prague, Umeå and Athens – Bound to Tunis
Get in touch to collaborate in the Mediterranean and elsewhere

Lately, her research has been revolving around botanical politics and power structures. She has been investigating how systems of meaning have been impressed upon nature, flora, and seeds throughout eras of imperialism, colonialism, and globalisation, resulting in the exhibitions Botany under Influence, apexart, New York, USA (2016); Leave No Stone Unturned [Remuer la terre], Le Cube — independent art room, Rabat, Morocco (2019); Ground Control [Markkontroll], Bildmuseet, Umeå, Sweden (2020); Planted in the Body, MeetFactory, Prague, Czech Republic (2021); Effet de Serre – Farah Khelil (Recipient of AFAC Visual Grant 2019), Parc du Belvédère, Tunis, Tunisia (2021), and in the essay Waking Dormant Seeds for Theatrum Botanicum, edited by Uriel Orlow and Shela Sheikh (Sternberg Press, 2018).

In this same line, she is interested in exploring the links between waters, toxicity and circulation, as initiated with Spoiled Waters Spilled, Ballet National de Marseille, Marseille, France in the framework of Manifesta 13, Les Parallèles du Sud. The show is bound to travel to the MMAG Foundation, Amman, Jordan, in 2021.

Recently, she curated Alter me, Alter you [Промени ме, променям те] at the Goethe-Institute Sofia, Bulgaria (2018); Olympic Stadium at Le Patio, Paris, France (2018); and the show, performance and night screening Au loin les signaux, al lou’lou’ held during the Heritage Days in the dockyards of L’Anse du Pharo, Marseilles, France (2017).

As an editor, she published driftongue with Clément Faydit and Alexandros Simopoulos (2018), result of a residency in Nuuk, Greenland (2017) – a workshop organise by Hors Pistes between international designers and local craftsmen. She also co-edited with Missla Libsekal In/Visible Voices of Women, an artist’s book on Safaa Erruas, Nadia Kaabi-Linke, Nicène Kossentini, Amina Menia and Zineb Sedira (2019).

In 2019, she participates to the HICP residency in Helsinki with a new research on textile and knowledge production, but also to Tate Intensive: The Case for Action at the Tate Modern, in London, UK to rethink institutions, and to Gathering for Rehearsing Hospitalities with Frame Finland in Helsinki talking about gestural, material and corporeal knowledge.

As a curator, Clelia is interested in how visual cultures tackle political, social and spiritual issues in different, or complementary, ways than other disciplines. Through the bias of her political science background, turning her a sort of outsider, her concern originates from her fascination for deconstructing the invisible power structures that shape geopolitics and for understanding resistance strategies to domination patterns. As such, she follows artists who question social norms and conventions, as well as investigate narratives around history, memory and knowledge production and dissemination. Rummaging through the complex and liminal spaces between private/public, integration/isolation, individual/collective and confinement/emancipation is particularly interesting in that framework. In this light, exploring communication structures, codes, language and gestures is also crucial for her.

She is also interested in creating interdisciplinary projects outside of traditional art circuits, particularly in contexts linked to craft or heritage and in spaces previously unused for cultural projects.